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There are many health risks in which women are more susceptible to than men but did you know African American women are at greater risk than their white counterparts for the same diseases? More and more, scientific studies are discovering direct relationships between certain health risks and race. Many organizations are committed to informing the African American community of these risks. However, despite aggressive advertisements and campaigns designed to raise awareness, statistics are revealing an increase in some areas. Presently, the top health risks affecting African American women today are HIV/AIDS, Breast Cancer, Heart Disease, Diabetes, Obesity and Uterine Fibroids.

DID YOU KNOW…

51 percent of all new HIV cases diagnosed are among African Americans and of that percentage, more than half are American women? (More than 60 percent of all youth cases are diagnosed in adolescents.)

one of the most common forms of cancer diagnosed in women is breast cancer? While post-menopausal breast cancer is diagnosed in a higher percentage of white women, pre-menopausal breast cancer is diagnosed at a higher percentage in African American women and it is the second leading cause of death (cancerous) among African American women.

African Americans are nearly twice as likely to be diagnosed with diabetes as opposed to their white counterparts, according to the American Diabetes Association? African Americans ages 20 and older make up more than 11 percent of diabetic cases while one in four African American women living with diabetes are ages 55 and over.

the number one cause of death for women in America is heart disease and the mortality rate is greatest in African American women?

African American Women have the greatest risk of obesity? Obesity increases one’s risk of developing hypertension, heart disease, Type II Diabetes, breast cancer, and stroke.

fibroids are the most common tumor in women and African American women are three times more likely to develop them than white women.

For more information, please visit your local health care physician. You can also visit these sites…

American Diabetes Association

Susan G. Komen

Black Women’s Health

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