Article from BlackVoices.comWe all have issues we wrestle with. Warranted or not, some of us try to charge it to our parents, or some other factor in our childhood. But try as we may, sometimes, we simply can’t. There are times when we own the issues outright. The titles are in our names — no co-signers. Whether it’s a fender bender or a full-on emotional car wreck, ultimately we’re the ones behind the wheel and we have to take responsibility for our issues and behavior.

I say all that to say — real talk — what’s up with grown men wanting grown women to call their men “daddy” and, accordingly, what’s up with the women who go along with it? This is a psychological doctoral dissertation waiting to happen. For my purposes, the question recently surfaced thanks to Usher’s new single, “Hey Daddy”, now in heavy rotation.

The song, itself, I somewhat like, the music and melody at least. If it were only sung in Portuguese or French, with no available translation, I might be okay. But unfortunately, more often than not, lyrics that we can understand tend to cheapen the experience. It’s the hazard of popular culture — shallowness. And this song would be Exhibit A. With words that include the following, it’s hard for me not to scratch my head: “you know your daddy’s home and it’s time to play…. poke it on out, poke it out right there, I’m a fall back while you work that chair “. Something about the reference to “daddy” in a sexual context strikes me, for the lack of a better word, as nasty. And I don’t mean that “ooh, you so nasty” type of nasty. I mean that crossing the line type of nasty that makes a woman say “[email protected] you nasty, get the hell out of my house!”

Maybe it’s me. Maybe, I’m the one who doesn’t get it, but I just can’t warm up to the dirty daddy talk. I understand that in most cases, it’s just that – talk or sexual theatre, as it were. However, let’s not pretend that all of it is simply lyrical when we know, unfortunately, in some cases, it’s literal. Can anyone say “to catch a predator“? See, what women need to know is any man who inquires to “who’s your daddy” and he really isn’t your daddy should be treated as a yellow traffic light — proceed with caution.

(Continue Reading Article @ Black Voices….)

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  • anon

    Personally I don’t call my father daddy, and I grew up with him as a very present figure so daddy doesn’t give me the same kind of knee jerk inclination to the word as portrayed in the song. This song by far is not the worst example of inappropriate for 12 year olds – let’s be real.

  • iCld never call my boyfriend/man/husband ‘daddy’ when Im still calling my father that… sorry, no can do. its just weird… now if things were sexually intense, and it slipped out… idk how i’d even feel…

    • oh yeah. and before iEven heard the song, iThought it was like a song dedicated to his sons or somethin… lol