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Blogger Blues

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You finally found an outlet, a distraction from your monotonous day job; and you’ve acquired a following that go as crazy over a pair of Forever 21 Miu Miu-inspired pumps as you do. But there’s a dark side of blogging that isn’t discussed nearly enough. The lows that come with the highs, the pressures, the challenges that fashion bloggers often face—all are frequently swept under vintage blazers and floor-length kimonos.

For starters, there’s the pressure to always be on point in public. You’d be amazed at how significantly having a blog with your photos on the Internet increases your visibility. Readers often approach you in the street. Those who don’t say hi sometimes size you up, thinking, “Oh, she’s not that cute in person.” You feel like your wardrobe can never have a lazy day. Heck, your reputation is on the line. You’ve got an image to upkeep. At least, that’s the way it feels . . .

But it doesn’t have to. One of the greatest things about meeting someone we admire in person is that they become more “human.” We realize that they’re no different from us and that we too can aspire to achieve the great things they have accomplished—whether that’s establishing a successful fashion blog or effortlessly coordinating a turban with harem pants.

Then there’s urge to spend tons and tons of money on the latest trends and high-end labels. You don’t need every new shoe or piece of jewelry that’s hot right now. As one fashion blogger told me, “It’s not worth it.” Part of your strength as a style maven is your innovation. Use those creative skills to create new looks out of what you already own. Your readers will be even more inspired.

Finally, getting hits and comments becomes a measure of your self-worth. You almost compulsively check your website to see how many visitors you’ve received and if anyone said anything negative about your ensemble. No responses to any given post is an indication of your failure. A dip in clicks one day means you’ve got to do better. It’s beginning to consume you and you can. not. stop.

Repeat after me: My blog is not an extension of myself. Like anything else you do, your blog should first and foremost please YOU. If a post has met your standards, then commend yourself for that. As long as you continue to challenge yourself and try new approaches just for the heck of it and for personal growth, other people will begin to take note. And if they don’t, that’s alright too. You’ve done something pretty commendable already—put yourself out there for the world to see. And THAT, my fellow bloggers, is pretty freaking amazing.

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  • 1. It’s spelled Miu Miu

    2. Agree on the comments and traffic part- it gets hard and, yes, at times I feel sad when I notice my traffic dipping. But it also gives me an idea on what my readers like and how I can perhaps improve.

    3. I think of my blog as an extension of me.

    4. @Risse: fear? of blogging? i say jump right in. Maybe you’d like to plan out what you’re going to write about for the first two weeks. make friends in the blogging community- if you’re a fashion blogger think of joining Independent Fashion Bloggers.

    5. At the end of the day, if I’m proud of the work I put out that’s all that matters. I can’t help but compare myself to other bloggers but at some point everyone does this (I think). So don’t feel bad and/ or try to keep up with the rest of ’em.

    (I realize lists can make a post/comment/reaction seem catty but I think better in lists lol)

  • I have always wondered how fashion bloggers keep up with the latest trends without hurting their pockets. My blog is about cultural identity and international news; it’s time-consuming, not time-and-money-consuming. I’m still not convinced that you can regularly update a fashion blog without breaking the bank…

    I also believe that my blog is an extension of who am I, which is why I am slightly concerned with comments rather than hits. It’s hard to extract this little bit of yourself, share it with the world and receive poor or no feedback when other blogs, like yours for example, get comments after every single post.
    With time, you learn not to compare myself with other blogs that have been around much longer and don’t address the same kind of issues you cover.
    I also realized that I got a lot of positive feedback in person from fellow students or even some teachers.

  • I loved this article! I just disagree a tiny little bit with some points.

    I have always wondered how fashion bloggers keep up with the latest trends without hurting their pockets. My blog is about cultural identity and international news; it’s time-consuming, not time-and-money-consuming. I’m still not convinced that you can regularly update a fashion blog without breaking the bank…

    I also believe that my blog is an extension of who am I, which is why I am slightly concerned with comments rather than hits. It’s hard to extract this little bit of yourself, share it with the world and receive poor or no feedback when other blogs, like yours for example, get comments after every single post. I learned not to compare myself with other blogs that have been around much longer and don’t address the same kind of issues I cover.
    I also realized that I got a lot of positive feedback in person from fellow students or even some teachers.