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Yesterday, novelist Tayari Jones launched an online initiative for aspiring and veteran writers called #WriteLikeCrazy. The intent is to provide a sense of accountability and community as writers work to meet deadlines both self-imposed and assigned. #WriteLikeCrazy and initiatives like it, which focus on encouragement, reminders, and check-ins, are a great way to aid in personal growth.

If you’ve ever felt like there was a great gulf fixed between you and your long-term goals, you may have found yourself sitting in front of a vision board, a calendar or journal, struggling to figure out all the steps necessary to bridge that gulf.

It’s true that no one will invest in your goals and your vision as much as you will, but often, just knowing that someone else cares enough about your success to follow-up, challenge you and make sure that you’re setting and meeting manageable deadlines can be the determining factor in whether or not you remain on tack or fall off.

Accountability can be applied to all areas of life. In addition to its professional benefits, it’s a key tool in managing and overcoming addiction, it helps people adhere to their religious or moral codes, and it’s a great de-stressing method. Choosing someone or a group of people who will express concern for your health and well-being can make your long-term aspirations seem far more manageable. Though some bristle at the idea of anyone nosing around their personal lives, nagging them about progress, or outright chiding them when their growth stalls, it’s important to recognize the value in seeking the help and advise of others.

Do you have an accountability partner? Are you part of a small work or social group that holds you accountable to the goals you’ve set?

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  • Mademoiselle

    Hm… I’m more of a “big reveal” type so I hardly ever let anyone know of my goals until I feel like it’s public-worthy (that goes for everything from exercising to new work initiatives). Part of the reason is I hate for my failures to be known publicly too, or I hate to not be far enough along in my projects that if they do fail there’s the potential for blaming my lack of effort or ability to get it done (that’s a topic for my non-existent therapist to explore). The concept of an accountability partner sounds nice though.

    • Candy 1

      Same here (your first sentence). I rarely let people know what I’m doing until my goal is complete.