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juror b29

Juror B29 was the only minority juror on the Zimmerman trial and today she spoke to Good Morning America about the case. Juror B29 bluntly stated that Zimmerman “got away with murder” and she owes the Martin family an apology.

“You can’t put the man in jail even though in our hearts we felt he was guilty,” said the woman who was identified only as Juror B29 during the trial. “But we had to grab our hearts and put it aside and look at the evidence.”

Juror B29, known by only her first name, Maddie, is Puerto Rican,  a nursing assistant and mother of 8 children.

“George Zimmerman got away with murder, but you can’t get away from God. And at the end of the day, he’s going to have a lot of questions and answers he has to deal with,” Maddy said. “[But] the law couldn’t prove it.”

 

From Good Morning America:

When the jury of six women—five of them mothers—began deliberations, Maddy said she favored convicting Zimmerman of second degree murder, which could have put him in prison for the rest of his life. The jury was also allowed to consider manslaughter, a lesser charge.

“I was the juror that was going to give them the hung jury. I fought to the end,” she said.

However, on the second day of deliberations, after spending nine hours discussing the evidence, Maddy said she realized there wasn’t enough proof to convict Zimmerman of murder or manslaughter under Florida law.

Zimmerman concedes he shot and killed Martin in Sanford on Feb. 26, 2012, but maintains he fired in self-defense.

“That’s where I felt confused, where if a person kills someone, then you get charged for it,” Maddy said. “But as the law was read to me, if you have no proof that he killed him intentionally, you can’t say he’s guilty.”

When asked by Roberts whether the case should have gone to trial, Maddy said, “I don’t think so.”

“I felt like this was a publicity stunt. This whole court service thing to me was publicity,” she said.

As a mother, Maddy said she has had trouble adjusting to life after the verdict, and has wrestled with whether she made the right decision.

“I felt like I let a lot of people down, and I’m thinking to myself, ‘Did I go the right way? Did I go the wrong way?'” she said.

“As much as we were trying to find this man guilty…they give you a booklet that basically tells you the truth, and the truth is that there was nothing that we could do about it,” she said. “I feel the verdict was already told.”

Maddy said she has sympathy for Martin’s parents and believes she, too, would continue the crusade for justice if this had happened to her son.

She said she believes she owes Trayvon Martin’s parents an apology because she feels “like I let them down.”

“It’s hard for me to sleep, it’s hard for me to eat because I feel I was forcefully included in Trayvon Martin’s death. And as I carry him on my back, I’m hurting as much Trayvon’s Martin’s mother because there’s no way that any mother should feel that pain,” she said.

 

What do you think about Juror B29’s comments?

 

 

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  • Overseas_Honeybee

    At the end of the day she willingly made a decision to go against her conviction and she will have to live with that for the rest of her life. GZ changed the game the moment he stepped out of his car. Everything she’s saying now … is all after the fact and does very little but to throw salt in a fresh wound.

  • Margery

    I worked for a federal judge as an extern while in law school and wrote and decided many of the judge’s decisions. Before I’d write a tentative rule, I would meet with the judge in chambers and would talk about the case from a practical NOT a legal standpoint. Of course, if the right thing to do was consistent with the law, we’d follow the law. If the right thing to do, however, was not consistent with the law then morality would win out and I’d find the law to justify our decisions. Sometimes what is moral MUST win out over what is legal. This woman should have stood her ground and done the moral thing and found GZ guilty of murder.

    • leelah

      he’s guilty under the law too, not just morally. no one told them that they had to believe his story. plus the manslaughter instructions said ‘negligent actions that caused the death of another’, following trayvon with a loaded gun and confronting him.