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President Obama today unveiled a bold, new initiative called ConnectED to connect 99 percent of America’s students to the internet through high-speed broadband and high-speed wireless within 5 years, calling on the FCC to modernize and leverage its existing E-Rate program to meet that goal. The President also directed the federal government to make better use of existing funds to get Internet connectivity and educational technology into classrooms, and into the hands of teachers trained on its advantages.  And he called on businesses, states, districts, schools and communities to support this vision. This ambitious initiative does not require Congressional action.  “We are living in a digital age, and to help our students get ahead, we must make sure they have access to cutting-edge technology,” said President Obama. “So today, I’m issuing a new challenge for America – one that families, businesses, school districts and the federal government can rally around together – to connect virtually every student in America’s classrooms to high-speed broadband internet within five years, and equip them with the tools to make the most of it.”  Preparing America’s students with the skills they need to get good jobs and compete with countries around the world will rely increasingly on interactive, individualized learning experiences driven by new technology. But today, millions of students lack high-speed broadband access and fewer than 20 percent of educators say their school’s Internet connection meets their teaching needs. ConnectED will bring high-speed Internet within their reach, with a particular benefit for rural communities that have lagged behind in connectivity.  In addition to connecting America’s students, ConnectED harnesses the ingenuity of the American private sector get new technologies into students’ hands and support digital learning content.  ConnectED also better invests existing federal funds to ensure that every educator in America receives support and training in using education technology tools to improve student learning. For more details on the ConnectED initiative, click HERE.

President Barack Obama is making  sexual assaults on college campuses a top priority. The White House released a report Wednesday citing lifelong health effects for victims of rape and  saying that “1 in 5 women have been sexually assaulted at college but that only 12 percent of student victims report the assault,” the Associated Press reports:

The report says rape’s prevalence is highest at college, fueled by drinking and drug use that can incapacitate victims. Obama is giving the task force of administration officials 90 days to come up with recommendations for colleges to prevent and respond to sexual assault, increase public awareness of each school’s track record and enhance coordination among federal agencies to hold schools accountable if they don’t confront the problem.

Obama senior adviser Valerie Jarrett, chair of the Council on Women and Girls, said men must be involved to combat the problem and the president wants to lead a cultural shift of men speaking out. “The president is committed to solving this problem, not just as president of the United States, but as a father of two girls” who will soon be heading to college, Jarrett said in an interview.

The report also declares that the criminal justice response to sexual assault is too often inadequate and lays out a goal of increasing arrest, prosecution and conviction rates without any specific targets. The report blames police bias and a lack of training to investigate and prosecute sex crimes for low arrest rates and says the federal government should promote training and help police increase testing of DNA evidence collected from victims.

Now if only they can do something about the universities that attempt to cover up the rapes that occur on campus. Also, hopefully this report and the universities will realize that a  person doesn’t get raped because they had a drink, a person gets raped because the man/woman decided to be a rapist. The blame needs to be taken off of the victim. Victim blaming has a large impact on why a person chooses not to report a rape.

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  • i think there’s a big difference between blaming the victim and blaming their judgement. in my opinion, a victim of rape can never be blamed. it’s always the rapist that’s to be blame. however, we’re all responsible for our own personal safety and there’s a lot an individual can do to reduce the risk of being victimized: learn some self defense skills. if someone attacks you, you can evade or fight back. how you dress matter: you can’t evade if you’re restricted by your cloths and footwear. it doesn’t matter after the fact, but to suggest this before anything happens is not victim blaming.

  • Amateur Hour

    How is this a priority? If this is a ploy to lock down the young female vote, the GOP is already doing an excellent job of that.

    College-age adults can work on this while the President grows a backbone and tackles critical policy issues like the war on drugs!

    • ughhhhh

      Rape and sexual assault is just as much a priority as the war on drugs.