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Santiago J. Erevia, Jose Rodela, Melvin Morris

On March 18th, 24 Army veterans will finally receive their Medal of Honor after a congressionally mandated review was put in place to make sure eligible recipients were not bypassed due to prejudice. According to the Associated Press, the veterans who are being honored are mostly of Hispanic or Jewish heritage, and only 3 are living.

“I never really did worry about decorations,” said one of those being honored, Melvin Morris of Cocoa, Fla., who was commended for courageous actions while a staff sergeant during combat operations on Sept. 17, 1969, in the vicinity of Chi Lang, South Vietnam.

Morris, who is black, said in an interview that it never occurred to him that his race might have prevented him from receiving the Medal of Honor. He said it was a huge surprise when the Army contacted him last May about the review and then arranged for a call from Obama.

“I fell to my knees. I was shocked,” Morris said. “President Obama said he was sorry this didn’t happen before. He said this should have been done 44 years ago.”

The other living recipients are Spc. 4 Santiago J. Erevia of San Antonio, cited for courage during a search and clear mission near Tam Ky, South Vietnam, on May 21, 1969; and Sgt. 1st Class Jose Rodela of San Antonio, cited for courage during combat operations in Phuoc Long province, South Vietnam, on Sept. 1, 1969.

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  • Harmony

    About time. Congrats to them. There are millions of other people that have been shut out and forgotten about that need medals and honors too!