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According to a new report from the Brookings Institution’s Hamilton Project, black male dropouts born in 1975 have a 70 percent chance of ending up in prison, three times lower for white male dropouts.

“It’s a very dramatic statement about the importance of keeping kids in schools and the consequences that occur when you don’t,” Dennis Parker, director of the Racial Justice Program at the American Civil Liberties Union, told HuffPost. “I hope this statistic wakes us up to the problems that we face as a society. It affects not only those people but all of us.”

Parker said this is bad news for the average taxpayer who pays for incarcerating prisoners.

“It also makes it impossible for a large number of people to reach their potential,” Parker said.

But apparently in the U.S., locking people up is big business. About $80 billion worth of big business in 2010.

From Huffington Post:

The effects of not completing high school are felt unevenly, as can be seen from this chart. By the age of 14, a child born to a black father who dropped out of high school has a 50 percent chance of having a dad in prison. Less than 10 percent of white dads without a diploma wind up in prison, the study shows.

“We’ve seen an increase in students being suspended from school, which means they’re more likely to drop out,” Parker said. “It is an extreme concern for us now.”

The racial disparity in the statistics may have to do with the fact that, as several studies have shown, black men are discriminated against at every stage of the criminal justice process from arrest to conviction to sentencing.

On Monday, author, professor and activist Cornel West spoke about these types of disparities at a rally against solitary confinement in New York.

“Solitary confinement is torture, and it’s a crime against humanity to lock folks up when 60 percent of them are there for soft drugs, and everybody knows 12 percent of those are on the chocolate side, 12 percent of those are on the vanilla side of flying high in the friendly skies every week taking drugs, but 65 percent of the convictions are chocolate,” West said, according to Democracy Now. “That just lets us know that the legacy of white supremacy is still operating in America.”

All of these studies and no solutions. But why solve a $80 billion money maker?

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  • handoverfost

    There more of a correlation between poverty and crime, those crimes in questions are mostly economic crimes or crimes trying to get money. Not to mention if one has felony on his record, that is a scarlet letter when looking for a job. And prison is a business nowadays, one prisoner is worth at least $50,000 a year, keeping him in prison is an asset, him being a productive citizen is a liability…

    Take note of Colorado, their prisons are going to lose money behind mary jane being legal now..

    • Ivory

      Can’t wait for California to follow suit. California needs a new cottage industry and apparently much if the drug violence south of the border is due to the marihuana trade.

      How many Mexicans lives can be saved if we liberalised drugs laws in thus country.

  • Deidrah

    I do not feel sorry for them at all.

  • zillaouch