New York Times

New York Times

Stacy Dash didn’t quiet get her wish because Black History Month rolled in any way. And this month is particularly special because The New York Times is publishing brand new, never before seen photos from their archives of revealing moments in black history. The publication notes that readers will now get a closer look at the charred wreckage of Malcolm X’s Queens home just hours after it was bombed. They’ll be taking us back to the Lincoln Memorial, six years before the March On Washington and to Lena Horne’s elegant penthouse on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. We’ll get up close and personal with the pioneers of Hollywood and Hip Hop as well as the ordinary people savoring everyday life.

Be sure to visit The New York Times site daily for updates.

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  • Certainly, it is immensely instructional to learn about Black History in February and throughout the year. Black History Month is part of my life and I will continue to love it for the rest of my life. Images convey messages, inspirational, and pristine themes of social activism. These images certainly represent our history filled with tumult, triumph, joy, and the wide range of human emotions. It is very important for people to know about Charlotte Forten, who was an amazing black abolitionist. She was a great black woman. Ruby Doris Smith Robinson was also a member of SNCC and she was a great civil rights activist. There was the great Dodge Revolutionary Union movement (or DRUM) in Detroit too from the late 1960’s and the early 1970’s, which advanced workers’ rights and the human rights of our Brothers and our Sisters. Therefore, the richness of black history is certainly amazing. Also, black children should learn about this history, because the children represent our future. Nothing will turn us around since we have hope and we believe in moving forward plus achieving real justice that we all hold dear enthusiastically.

  • Rizzo

    beautiful images. maybe one day in the future clutch will mention gordon parks. his photography of the segregated south was astounding — so beautiful, yet so very sad.

    • Chazz A

      Yes indeed, Mr Park’s work was monumental. Hopefully the Times will post some of his imagery on the site.

    • Rizzo

      he wasn’t too bad as a filmmaker either — shaft and the learning tree were excellent movies. i have to give isaac hayes a standing ovation, to, for his composition of the theme song shaft. the album is still awesome today.

    • Chazz A

      Yes, I’ve seen both films many times. In fact, a couple of scenes in Shaft were shot in my Mother’s old neighborhood in Harlem.
      As for Isaac Hayes aka Black Moses, he was a musical genius. I have the original vinyl album too.

    • Rizzo

      i have that album, too!!! it was, and still is, one of the greatest. mr. isaac hayes aka black moses — he definitely was a musical genius. he wasn’t too bad as an actor either :)

    • Mary Burrell

      Did he do The Learning Tree i watched that last week?

    • Rizzo

      yes, he did. it was based on his life. he was really talented.

    • Mary Burrell

      My favorite Gordon Parks piece is the one with the elderly black cleaning lady next to the American flag. Government Work is the name of the piece.

    • Rizzo

      i don’t know the name of the photograph, but there is a black woman and a little black girl standing outside on a beautiful sunny day. both are dressed in beautiful white dresses. above them hangs a neon sign that says colored entrance. there is another one i love, too. i think this one is entitled outside looking in — a group of black children peering through a cyclone fence at swings and slides they are not allowed to play on. so very very sad.

    • Mary Burrell

      That one is one of my favorites as well.

    • Gordon Parks was definitely a genius.

  • Chazz A

    I don’t usually compliment the NY Times but I must say, this collection is impressive. The picture of the black children marching in the first African American parade in Harlem is a classic.

  • Mary Burrell

    Lena Horne looking glamorous in her leopard coat.