Jenna Wortham is a technology reporter for the New York Times, covering digital culture, Web start-ups, and mobile communications. A graduate of the University of Virginia, Wortham has worked as a technology and culture reporter for Wired.com and freelance writer for Wired magazine, Bust magazine, and Frommer’s. Using the joint power of online and print journalism, she delivers quality stories on the ways that consumers are using technology in their daily lives in addition to covering emerging technology businesses and the leaders shaping the start-up industry. Follow Jenna on Twitter @jennydeluxe for the best of technology journalism.

Lashanda Henry is the creator of numerous websites, including SistaSense, WebTechGurl, Multiple Shades of You Online, and BlackWomeNetwork, which reinforce her dedication to providing coaching and advice to Black women exploring entrepreneurship and the technology space. As a profiting entrepreneur, Henry shares her knowledge with women across the globe on how to make real money online through developing websites, affiliate programs, selling ad space, blogging, and selling eBooks. Through video tutorials and blog posts, Henry proves that technology entrepreneurship is doable and profitable for women willing to invest in quality information and good strategy. Learn more at LashandaHenry.com.

Lizz Burr is a twenty-something blogger and web developer with an undeniable passion for the Internet. She started writing for the web in 1999, before it was even called “blogging,” and went on to hone her interests to designing and developing websites. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Comparative Media Studies from MIT, and received her master’s degree in Communication Management, with an emphasis in Online Communities, from the University of Southern California Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Burr seeks to uncover ways that Black Americans, Native Americans, and women use and consume content on the web in addition to how they’re represented in this space. Follow her on Twitter @calinative to get her daily musings and inspirations from the web.

Lynne d Johnson is a content and community consultant to help brands become more human and build better relationships with consumers. She is the former Senior Social Media Strategist at R/GA, the digital agency of the decade, and Senior Vice President of Social Media for the Advertising Research Foundation (ARF). Prior to the ARF, she was the Senior Editor and Community Director for FastCompany.com, and General Manager of New Media for VIBE, SPIN, and VIBE Vixen. Clearly a friend to major brands and businesses, Johnson has proven her expertise to be viable and powerful in the technology world. But her talents don’t stop there, as she also works as a professional journalist for numerous esteemed publications, such as Cool Hunting, New York Press, The Source, and PAPER magazine. She serves as an adjunct professor at the Metropolitan College of New York, and holds an MBA in Media Management. Follow Lynne on Twitter @lynneluvah for fresh tweets on media, marketing, music, and pop culture.

Tiffani Bell is the founder of Pencil You In, a web application that allows hairstylists, barbers, make-up artists, and nail techs to effectively manage their businesses and accept appointments online. As one of two women in the first class of the NewMEAccelerator, the feature of CNN’s Black in America 4, the 26-year-old entrepreneur embodies our faith in a diversity shift in Silicon Valley. The Howard University engineering graduate is working steadfast to get Pencil You In off the ground and into consumers’ lives. Visit Pencil You In’s website for more information and prepare to get access to your stylist’s calendar 24/7.

Are you excited to see Black women making strides in the technology world? Know a Black woman in the field that deserves a shout out? Share this article to elevate our voices and join the conversation.

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  • I love to see women, of any race, Lol. Well, that too, but in the tech industry is what I meant, nice to see black women in the industry. Too few around to make it a more balanced field.