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I don’t know if “where were you when you found out that Whitney Houston died?” will become the same kind of generational question that “where were you when you found out that Michael Jackson died?” has become, and certainly not the old “where were you when you found out that JFK had been shot?” eventually became for the generation before mine. But John Stewart hits the media analysis nail on the head by asking why on earth CNN would choose to take to the streets with breaking news about Whitney Houston’s death and capture reactions from random people as part of its news broadcast. Watch his critique of that coverage here:

There’s been a lot of disrespectful coverage of Whitney Houston’s death in the media, but it’s easy to forget how guerilla reporters got with that information from the very beginning. Hats off to The Daily Show for keeping an eye on the ridiculousness that mainstream media outlets try to get away with. Not only does he add a dash of humor to what is hard to see as at all funny, he really calls folks to task without actually being a journalist at all. That CNN would “take to the streets like a town crier” to add a dose of reality tv to its broadcast is at once hilarious and disturbing, and its refreshing that he’d call it out.

What do you think of CNN’s approach?

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  • TV news is abominable. If you watch Channel 11 news in NYC, the first 10 minutes is dedicated to 10 minutes of local news, including deaths, shootings, and the like; after the commercial break, weather, and sports. Later on, three different men rant for 10 minutes each about different topics. -__- True journalism has died since 9/11. During 9/11, people looked to the news for information. Not the latest gossip.

  • Netta

    I concur @Simone!