#trending

It’s been two years since Willow Smith debuted her song “Whip My Hair” (time flies, huh?) and every step of the way lots of people, especially women (moms and non-moms, alike) have felt it necessary to critique the 12-year-old daughter of Will Smith and Jada Pinkett Smith. From her signature eclectic style of dressing to her various lengths and colors of hair, it’s clear that Willow s free to do her own thing. Critics say the little girls parents need to reign her in, Mama Jada says: “little girls should not be a slave to the preconceived ideas of what a culture believes a little girl should be.” Boom. (Black Voices)

Tamika Wilkins is an up-and-coming fashion designer out of D.C. and shows off some of her favorite fashion looks (steal these for work this week). We love her big hair and her style—a perfect mix of uptown polish and downtown edge. (Refinery 29)

Imagine the horror these parents are going through. According to reports, the parents of college student Jasmine Benjamin found out that their daughter was killed—via Facebook. More than a week has passed since the 17-year-old freshman at Valdosta State University was discovered in a dorm’s shared, common study room. The parents are asking for answers. (Huffington Post)

Want bold brows like Jourdan Dunn? You can get her perfect arches with a few simple steps, Just make sure not to over-tweeze and invest in a quality brow pencil. (Allure)

Glam rapper Azealia Banks knows her party clothes. Among the Asos holiday 2012 spokeswoman’s advice: lick your teeth and pack on the glitter. (Refinery 29)

 

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  • Mademoiselle

    I hope the Jasmine Benjamin story gets a full article this week. I’d rather read several paragraphs about our missing/forgotten children than several articles of public transportation violence (although I am aware of which of the two is more likely to trend and get clicks). Just my opinion.

  • Mademoiselle

    I hope the Jasmine Benjamin story gets a full article this week. I’d rather read several paragraphs about our missing/forgotten children than several articles of public transportation violence (even though I am aware of which of the two is more likely to trend and get clicks). Just my opinion.