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Mo Abudu

Nigerian entrepreneur Mo Abudu has been called “Africa’s Oprah Winfrey” because of her vast media empire and popular talk show, but it’s a label she doesn’t want.

“Oprah Winfrey is someone I have a huge amount of respect for, but what I often find is that the West always needs to find a reference point in the West for something that goes back to Africa,” she said in a recent interview with the BBC. “I admire her, I think she’s done a lot of great things, we have some things in common, but I would like to be called Mo.”

Abudu’s stance is indicative of her mission to change the narrative about Africa. Since founding EbonyLifeTV, Africa’s first global Black multi-broadcast entertainment network,” in 2013, Abudu’s channel has launched in 49 countries across the continent, she was named the most successful woman in Africa by Forbes, and she’s just produced her first film, Fifty

While many across the diaspora look to the West for examples, Abudu’s goal is to tell African stories–for Africans, by Africans.

“We are going to give the stories an African flavor. We will localize it, because there’s nothing that the West has that Africa doesn’t have: we love, we fight, we kiss, we make up,” she told the BBC. “We like all the good things in life. There’s good and there’s evil globally. So all those human interests, those things that appeal to you, believe me, appeal to us also.”

We agree.

Take a look at Mo Abudu’s interview with the BBC below. 

(h/t Shadow & Act)

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  • TivoliEclipse

    Look at her hair. Why? She’s in Africa. Who are they trying to impress? They like all the good things in life. Everything that appeals to the West appeals to them. Another mucking slave.

    • Get out troll

    • You beat me to it!!!

    • lindy

      I agree….her hair was the first thing I noticed…its really horrible.

  • Rizzo

    “ … Oprah Winfrey is someone I have a huge amount of respect for, but what I often find is that the West always needs to find a reference point in the West for something that goes back to Africa, …’
    ‘ … While many across the diaspora look to the West for examples, Abudu’s goal is to tell African stories–for Africans, by Africans… ‘
    could it be that African americans and Africans feel a kinship — a sort of reference, or ties, to a shared origin. for some strange reason, the above made me think about paul mooney: ‘ … we waited and nobody came for us … Africans wrote us off like a bad check …’
    this woman was brought up and educated in the uk. this article made me feel depressed.

    • AfroCapricornette

      What are you on about? You’re making no sense at all. So just because she was educated in the UK, she’s less African than others not? Many Africans educated here, Europe or Asia for higher degrees (JD, PhD etc) do so to be able to contribute and elevate their cities, countries and continent as a whole.

      Many who live abroad actually do philanthropic work back home or link local and Western companies to implement certain needs there. She’s talking about Africa and Africans telling their story, especially as the West has historically viewed the continent through the ‘danger of a single story” as Ms Adichie (if you know who she is) put it. Do you want her to talk about AA on local African channels? Is that your gripe? Smh

    • You’re right that Africans have made great philanthropic work.

    • Rizzo

      I’m on about: could it be that African americans and Africans feel a kinship — a sort of reference, or ties, to a shared origin. let me now smh

  • Africans have
    every right to tell their own stories. Also, it is a fact that Africans and
    African Americans have collaborated in pan-African efforts for decades. There
    were many Pan-African conferences throughout the 20th century. Many
    Africans have expressed solidarity with the African American struggle for human
    rights. I am glad that Mo Abudu wants to be her own woman. Likewise, Africa is
    a diverse continent and the negative stereotypes about Africa must be
    repudiated. Mo did a great job in the interview to dispel many of the myths and
    stereotypes about Africa. There are issues in Africa, but Africa has a lot of
    strong people who want to do better and have the same struggles and joy as any
    other people have in the places of the world. She’s right to want to empower
    women and that African women stories are very important to show. That is why
    African media to show a balanced image of Africa is very important. Also,
    Africa deserves more voices, the fight against poverty, and Africans should
    tell their own views without filter or obfuscation.

  • ALM247

    She’s right. She’s great in her own right.

  • paintgurl40

    She’s right. American media has most of us believing that all Africans live in huts, they’re all starving, and have to fight off the lions and cheetahs at night. They live just like we do, sometimes depending on your P.O.V even better. I started watching the Africa channel and watching African movies on Netflix. Some of those movies have SO MUCH drama and I am thoroughly entertained.